Experimenting with Colorhue Dyes

Several years ago I bought a starter set of Colorhue dyes to try them out. These dyes are special in that they strike the silk almost immediately, i.e. they don't move freely like other dyes. Best of all, they need no extra setting to make them permanent. At the time I found that the immediate striking of the silk was hindering my way of painting - I found that I wanted more movement, so I banished them to the closet. But it's funny how pretty much everything that languishes in my supply closet eventually sees the light of day again!

Last week I decided to see how the Colorhue could work in my new scarf venture. I laid a piece of very wet silk on plastic wrap, scrunched it up, and painted blotches of turquoise and pink dye. This is the wet silk. I thought that with so much water present, the dyes would move and blend a bit but they hardly did. The purple you see is from my painting turquoise directly over pink, not from the dyes blending on their own, as my usual dyes would.
Deborah Younglao Colorhue dye experiment
They did do something wild and wonderful though. The dye settled in the folds of the wet silk and because the color stayed put, formed a beautiful crystalline pattern of dark lines over the whole piece as it dried, still scrunched. I thought the lines might wash out but I didn't lose the pattern when I rinsed the excess dye out. I love it! Colorhue and I are friends again. Although they are fabulously expensive, I think I could have some fun with them!
Deborah Younglao Colorhue dye experiment
I did this scarflette with Colorhue, scrunching a different way and applying the dyes very lightly, which yields a different type of pattern.
Deborah Younglao Colorhue dyed silk scarf
Deborah Younglao Colorhue dyed silk scarf
This teeny scarf and the one below it (also Colorhue) make great spring hair scarves and are available in my Artfire store.

Deborah Younglao Colorhue dyed silk scarf
Deborah Younglao Colorhue dyed silk scarf